Snowdonia National Park

Places to visit in North Wales

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North Wales is on the up-and-up as a tourist destination. From the magical site of Snowdonia, dominated by Wales’ highest peak, to the coast of golden sand and natural structures, there’s plenty to marvel at.

The region is a land of secret beaches, expansive national parks, eccentric towns and vast mountain ranges. A North Wales caravan holiday is the go-to package for seeing it all. We've compiled the most scenic and exciting Haven-recommended days out, all within range of the best caravan parks in North Wales, all so you can explore hassle-free.

Snowdonia

Snowdonia National Park

Rich in Welsh culture and possessing the highest mountain in Wales, Snowdonia National Park is world-famous. As majestic as it is vast, this region really stands out when it comes to natural beauty. From the sweeping white beach at Harlech, to the greenery of prehistoric Celtic rainforests, there’s a great deal of variety in the landscape.

You can see it all from the peak Snowdon which can be reached by The Snowdon Mountain Railway, a narrow-gauge rack and pinion railway, or by foot for the more adventurous at heart. Under an hour’s drive from some of the best caravan parks in North Wales, Betws-y-Coed is often considered the gateway to Snowdonia and the neighbouring villages, that’s why we recommend making this your starting point. If you’re a nature enthusiast, you won’t regret it.

Portmeirion

Portmeirion, North Wales

This truly unique destination is an eccentric simulation of a quaint Italian village in North Wales. Lying at the foot of Snowdonia, Portmeirion is famous thanks to its use as the filming location for the iconic sixties spy drama, The Prisoner. Two stylish hotels serve lunch and afternoon tea, while a selection of the village’s cafes and a gelateria provide an authentic Italian gourmet touch to the town.

Wander the sub-tropical gardens and gaze at the pastel houses as you let your imagination and the kids roam. The colours on display are instantly recognisable for their mesmerising and surreal quality, so don’t forget to bring your camera to take some otherworldly shots of the picturesque architecture.

Caernarfon

Caernarfon, Wales

Home to a majestic fortress, this castle town is a staple for visitors in North Wales. While several other Welsh castles are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, none quite stir the imagination like Caernarfon’s distinctive turrets and vast moat. Don’t miss the newest attraction “Legends of the Sky”, a captivating 3D experience that allows you and your kids to ride a virtual dragon around the castle grounds and breathe fire!

While the mighty Caernarfon Castle may be what puts the town on the map, the narrow, winding streets and stylishly redeveloped waterfront are also well worth visiting. Take a seat at one of the many charming pubs that line the waterfront for views out across the Menai Strait to Anglesey and watch the sun go down.

Llandudno

Llandudno, North Wales

Llandudno is one of the most popular towns in all of Wales thanks to its two sandy beaches and picture-perfect promenade. The town gained popularity in the 19th-century alongside the advent of tourism in Victorian times and it remains the largest seaside resort in Wales to this day. The town is bordered to the north with two miles of beach which provide ample room for the kids to build a sandcastle or two and a scenic backdrop for a paddle.

The town’s pier is also an award winner and is host to many seafront attractions such as fairground rides and amusement arcades. You can also walk or take the historic tramway to the summit of the limestone headland named the Great Orme which offers splendid, panoramic views over Llandudno itself.

Conwy

Conwy, North Wales

Just across the River Conwy from Llandudno, lies the historic castle town of Conwy. This truly one-off location is one of Britain’s best-preserved medieval towns claiming the crown of the most intact town walls in Europe. Enclosed within these walls is a maze of narrow cobbled streets, nooks and crannies chock-full of historic buildings to discover. The dark-stoned castle, even after all these years, still preserves an authentic medieval atmosphere and is one of the best places to visit in North Wales.

However, Conwy is more than just its castle. The expansive lawns of Bodnant Garden, a heritage marina and quay and Britain’s smallest building all await you in this gem of North Wales.

Visitors are spoiled for choice when visiting Conwy and Llandudno with two marvellous Haven locations nearby – our caravan parks at Greenacres and Presthaven. With plenty of activities on offer, there are so many reasons to visit.